April 30, 2014

Our sixth annual Responsibility Report

Last week we released our sixth annual Responsibility Report, highlighting the progress we’ve made in 2013 in the environmental and social responsibility arenas. From initiatives like onboard recycling, to investing in our crewmembers and the communities in which we live in.

Read highlights of the report below or read the complete report here.

Climate Change and Decreasing Environmental Impact

  • Climate change: JetBlue is communicating transparently about climate change. We work every day to reduce our environmental impact and are fully committed to meeting the International Air Transport Association (IATA) targets for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions. These include joining an industry pledge to cut carbon emissions 50 percent by 2050, relative to 2005 levels. (Want to learn more? Our CEO Dave Barger was recently speaking about it.)
  • Partnering to protect oceans: No one benefits when oceans and beaches are polluted. JetBlue teamed up with The Ocean Foundation to explore a novel approach to ocean health in the Caribbean. Destinations in Latin America and the Caribbean make up one-third of our route network, and the health and appearance of these destinations have a direct impact on our revenue. With The Ocean Foundation’s help, JetBlue is showing the economic value of clean beaches by directly tying the importance of nature to the airline’s main economic measure – revenue per available seat mile (RASM). (Want to help? Take our survey!)
  • Composting: In most terminals valuable food scraps are sent to landfills, where their nutritional value is lost and they emit GHGs during decomposition. JetBlue decided to do something different. At JFK’s T5, we began a partnership to compost food waste.  Through our composting partnership, we send nearly 300 pounds of material each day (55 tons annually) to a composting facility where it is turned into fertilizer and nutrient-rich soil for farms.

Governance and Transparency

  • Conflict materials: JetBlue purchases minerals to make the TVs on the aircraft. These TVs would not work without critical minerals to transmit signals and images. These minerals can only be sourced through mining in specific locations and not all mining and sourcing is created equal. Some minerals including, but not limited to, tungsten, tantalum, tin and gold, come from mines that engage in horrific and widespread human atrocities. We do not intend to fund these mines through its supply-chain and have started a deep audit of its supply-chain connected to their TVs and its LiveTV subsidiary that manufactures them.

Investing in its People

  • Marriage equality: JetBlue treats all crewmembers equally. The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) made this difficult. For some crewmembers, this meant their partners could not be recognized as “spouses” by federal law, and couldn’t receive federal marriage benefits. Last year, JetBlue signed an amicus brief together with 278 employers and organizations, in the case of United States vs Windsor, who was challenging the Act’s constitutionality.

Investing in the Community

  • Volunteerism: JetBlue’s Community Connection program ties corporate giving with crewmembers’ passions. Through this program, crewmembers log the hours they volunteer with nonprofits and for every 25 hours, JetBlue donates a travel certificate for the charity of their choice. In total, 1,040 crewmembers volunteered 69,635 hours of their own time in 2013.
  • STEM/Aviation Education: JetBlue took its support for STEM education to the next level in 2013. By creating the JetBlue Foundation, the airline will put aviation on the map as a top career choice for students. The Foundation is company-sponsored, but independent from JetBlue. In 2013, the Foundation awarded $25,000 grants to three aviation-focused high school and college programs.

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